Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is the oldest, professional continually practiced medicine in the world. Medical therapies that are included in the scope of practitioners who practice Traditional Chinese Medicine include:

Chinese Confucian Man


TCM, also known as Oriental Medicine, or Asian Medicine is believed to have been developed over 4,000 years ago and continues to evolve today.

Traditional Chinese Medicine has become one of the safest and most rapidly recognized forms of holistic health care in the United States.

Licensed Acupuncturists, designated as L.Ac., are the primary practitioners of TCM in the United States.

Chinese Therapeutic Massage

Chinese Massage is an important part of Chinese Medicine and is used in various ways to assist the body's healing processes.
Chinese Massage Tuina
Colleges that teach Chinese Medicine often include expert instruction in many forms of Asian Bodywork.

Forms of Asian Bodywork include: Tuina, Shiatsu, Jin Shin Do, Medical Qigong, and many others.
The American Organization for Bodywork Therapies of Asia™ (AOBTA®) was developed in 1989 to support, promote, teach, and regulate Asian Bodywork Therapies in the United States.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is an ancient healing technique based on the movement of energy or Qi in the body.

Acupuncture Needles


Healthy flow of Qi is restored when specific points, which have been meticulously mapped and studied by the Chinese over thousands of years, are stimulated with tiny, specially-made acupuncture needles.

For people who are reluctant to try needles, many practitioners of Chinese Medicine utilize effective Non-needling Techniques, including acupressure, gentle tapping, heat, color, and vibration.

Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese Herbal Medicine, which includes Nutrition and Dietary Advice, is an important aspect of the holistic approach. Hippocrates, the Greek physician and philosopher once said, "Food is medicine, and medicine is food".
Food is Medicine_Vegetables
Traditional Chinese Medicine emphasizes that nutrition is the basis of health.

Foods consumed on a daily basis can either weaken or strengthen the body's physiological processes.

TCM practitioners, such as Licensed Acupuncturists, often support healing by providing dietary recommendations or by prescribing herbal teas based on traditional knowledge as well as current pharmacological data.



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